Success!


Small box containing strips of packing paper and a note that reads THANK YOU; lid is off to the side, both are sitting on a light wooden table.
Photo by Monstera on Pexels.com

We want to take a moment to thank EVERYONE who participated in our inaugural event. Whether you pitched a project, supported your friends, or perused and liked pitches as an agent or acquisitions editor/publisher, we couldn’t have done it without you. Stats are in and they look GREAT! We couldn’t have asked for a better turnout for our first event.

Speaking of stats, a huge thank you goes out to an invaluable member of the #WritingCommunity, Robert Mosley, who provides stats after pitch events so participants can see information about the events and so organizers like us can see how successful the event was. If you’d like to see the info he pulled and broke down for us, take a look on Twitter here:

In our case, even though it was our first pitch event, numbers were booming! We expected lower numbers because that’s the nature of a new event. But even with fewer participants than other more established pitch events, agents and publishers were out there liking pitches just as much if not more so that in other events. Nearly a quarter of all pitches received likes by industry professionals, and more than 11% of those were from agents. Stats like that are on par with big events like PitMad (no longer in operation) and DVPit!

That is all you, #writers! You all did such an amazing job with your pitches and moodboards!

We are so thrilled and absolutely cannot wait to grow this pitching platform for querying writers.

Many agents and editors have reached out saying how much they enjoyed it and can’t wait to participate in the next one, which is scheduled for Thursday, November 3rd. We already have a list going (and growing!) of participating agents and publishers!

Remember, even if you didn’t receive a like, it is in no way representative of you or your work. Unfortunately, none of us can control the Twitter algorithms, but we can say that the more engaged you are in the writing community, the better your chances of getting seen will be! And interacting with writers and finding new writer friends is the best aspect of pitch events!

A pitch event is only one path to finding an agent or publisher, so don’t fret, and don’t give up. Keep being the amazing writers you are, and you will reach your goals!

And here’s a reminder to please do yourself the favour of fully researching any agent or publisher who you’re considering sending query materials to. Ensure that they are a good fit for you and your story. We are unable to control who participates in our event, meaning that we can’t stop the shady ones from liking pitches and conning writers into sending materials to vanity presses, schmagents, etc. We are also not a platform for editors to look for clients, so if you do get an editor like, just check to make sure that they’re an acquisitions editor, not a freelance editor looking for clients. Some genuinely don’t know that’s not what a pitch event is for, so give them the benefit of the doubt. But a general rule of thumb is you should *never* have to pay for having your query material read or for any services with traditional publishers. If you are choosing to self-publish/indie-publish with say, a hybrid publisher, then yes, there are typically up-front fees involved. But presses who claim they are traditional publishers should not be asking for any up-front fees from you. Traditional publisher typically means they cover expenses on your behalf as part of your contract. If they’re asking for fees and you’re aiming to traditionally publish, it’s a red flag.

Regarding agents, check out their manuscript wish list. It’ll be on their agency website, but in many cases it’s also on www.manuscriptwishlist.com and/or on the agent’s Twitter page. Sometimes an agent or agency will like a pitch for a genre they don’t typically represent. You can still take the opportunity to query, though. Perhaps they are looking to expand their represented genres. Check out Victoria Strauss’ Writer Beware website to ensure there’s nothing shady going on with an agent or agency. And remember, use your own judgement, too. Trust your instincts. Newer agents are still agents, so just because they don’t have a big client list doesn’t mean they aren’t good at what they do and won’t be the biggest champion of your book. Check to see where they interned, who they learned from. You sign with an agent, but also with the agency, and that means you have the benefit of the agency’s contacts and expertise. Sometimes agents have come from an agency who had a fallout of some sort. Don’t hold this against the agent. Do your research to the best of your ability, and if it feels right to query, go for it!

We wish everyone who is querying the best of luck!

We were impressed that many of you remembered to use alt text on your moodboards, and hope to see more folks using it regularly so that visually impaired people can participate and feel included, too. Here is a fantastic thread to explain why it’s so important and how to easily add it to your tweets that include images.

We will soon be adding some testimonials to our website, so be on the lookout for that! We may also call on some writers to ask if we can showcase their pitches to help other writers learn the elements of a good pitch. If we don’t ask you, this does not mean we didn’t like your pitch; it simply means we don’t always see every pitch and may have missed it, and we aren’t able to post everyone’s pitches. If you were successful at getting agent and publisher likes and especially if you went on to sign with an agent or publisher, please let us know so we can share with other writers the #MoodPitch that got you your contract!

Once again, thank you so much. We are celebratinig this success and can’t wait to see #MoodPitch grow!


People holding glasses of Champagne up to cheers; gold confetti flying around and string lights in the background.
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

Did you participate? How did you find it? Reach out to us and let us know how you found the event, and keep us up to date if you received likes and submitted your query package to an agent or publisher! We would love to share your success stories on our page!

Important Statement Update

Please read the important statement released yesterday regarding what transpired in our #PreMoodPitch events this past weekend. We want to be clear to everyone who intends to participate: this is not a place for hate, bigotry, or any discrimination of any kind. Posts that are blatantly offensive will be reported to Twitter for removal. We welcome all communities in our inclusive platform. And we want to apologize for our ignorance on the topics of Islamophobia and orientalism that further harmed the Muslim community.



This is a positive and inclusive environment. Any tweet that uses our hashtags (#MoodPitch or #PreMoodPitch) that is offensive or harmful to anyone in any community will be reported. Please, as writers, be sensitive to your audience. If you aren’t sure if what you’re writing might be offensive to others, check in with a sensitivity reader. If it’s deemed harmful, perhaps take a look at the topics you’re writing and ask yourself if this is your story to tell. If you are writing something intentionally harmful, then we don’t welcome that here. Educate yourself on the concepts you’re writing about. Educate yourself on discrimination, Islamophobia, homophobia, racism, etc.

Thank you for your understanding.

Important Statement

Friends, we ask that you please read the important statement released today after a sensitive topic was brought to our attention. We want you all to know we are inclusive in every way we can be and do not represent or condone hateful or hurtful language or content from anyone. If you have any questions, please reach out.



Upcoming #PreMoodPitch Schedule of Events

We are excited to bring you some fun activities in the days leading up the the main event to help get you pumped and ready! Take a look at the schedule below and feel free to reach out with any questions. For the activities, please use the hashtag #PreMoodPitch instead of #MoodPitch so we don’t clog up the #MoodPitch feed.



April 1 – #PreMoodPitch Twitter chat will run begin at 9pm ET. This involves some questions to help you craft your pitches and will give you a chance to ask us about #MoodPitch or Twitter pitch events in general. The chat goes all night to accommodate various time zones around the globe.

April 2 – Moodboard + pitch practise and feedback. Not sure if your moodboard or pitch needs tweaking? Share it for some practise and use the #FB if you’d like feedback/a critique. Anyone can offer feedback, and if you do, please make it positive and constructive. Rude comments will be hidden from view. We are here to curate a positive, encouraging, and helpful environment for pitch participants.

April 3 – Do you have a famous movie star you’ve “casted” as your MC? Do you have a sketch? Share your MC with us and describe the stakes they’re up against.

April 4 – Query Package Trivia Night! At 9pm ET, get ready for a handful of trivia questions. Some questions may have more than one correct answer. Participants who answer all 5 questions before 9:59pm ET on April 4/22 will be entered for a chance to win a query letter critique from Kathleen @FoxxEditorial!

April 5 – Share a GIF that best represents your manuscript.

April 6 – Interview time! There will be 10 interview questions posted in the thread. Answer a few, or answer them all – but through your protagonist’s perspective! It’s amazing how different (or more detailed) the answers can be when they’re answered by the protagonist as opposed to the writer who created them!

April 7THE BIG DAY!


Moodboard Tutorial with Special Guest Taylor Grothe


There are many of you out there who want so badly to participate in #MoodPitch but have NO IDEA how to make a moodboard. Well, fear not, writers! We’ve teamed up with gothic horror novelist Taylor Grothe to bring you an amazing tutorial on how to build moodboards! Her aesthetics are so moody and vibe-y and we couldn’t think of a better person to bring you tips!

Below you’ll find a step-by-step guide on how to build a moodboard, complete with photos through the process.

There is also a VIDEO on You Tube where you can catch Kathleen chatting with Taylor about moodboards. We answer the lingering question: why build a moodboard? And, of course, Taylor will take you through the process on her screen as she builds a moodboard right before your eyes.

Taylor is a wonderful USA author of gothic horror. She’s represented by Larissa Melo Pienkowski of Jill Grinberg Literary Management and is currently out on submission with her debut novel. She’s also an AMM ’22 Mentor. Her website is at www.taylorgrothe.com. She makes the most incredible moodboards, so Kathleen thought she would be the perfect person to guide you through the process!

Without further ado, here is Taylor, presenting us with her written guide on how to make your aesthetics powerful and beautiful.


How to Create a Killer Moodboard!

Hi everyone! I’m Taylor, and I’m thrilled to be able to bring you this how-to so you can create some amazing moodboards and win those agents over! Be sure to watch the You Tube video here so you can get an even better idea of how it’s done.

First of all, you’re going to need some stuff: Canva is my favorite program/app but you can also, of course, use any program that helps you lay out images (Layout, VSCO, Pic Collage, etc.) Next, you’ll need to source some images, so get those search engines ready (my favorite place is Unsplash, but I also use Pinterest.) Make a folder on your desktop, too, so you can deposit images and access them quickly. Now you’re ready to go!


1. Find your images! I suggest going nuts at this stage, collecting anywhere between 10-20-100 images that speak to you about your plot. Don’t worry yet about how they fit together, just grab a bunch and stick them into a folder. You can decide later.


2. Decide on a theme and color story! This is easier said than done. When I begin a mood board, I like to try and imagine the color palette of the book or short I’ve written; for me, it’s often a blue-toned color story, since horror is by nature full of shadows. Think about the cover you might imagine for your story—does it take place in a warm setting, like a desert? Likely, then, you’ll be trending into reds and pinks and terra cottas. Is your theme found family? Then you might be looking a warm, soft palette. 


3. Decide what you want the focus of your mood board to be. Is it your main character? Your setting? An object that shows up multiple times in your plot and ties it all together? Typically, that will be your center image. Make a choice and stick to it!


4. In my opinion, having space between images looks a little old-fashioned. If that’s your theme, go for it! Otherwise, reduce spacing between images to nothing, so that all your images touch. I suggest setting your background color to black so that any miniscule space between the images isn’t as obvious.


5. Decide your layout. I like odd numbers so you have a center frame; mine are typically 9 squares (even rows of 3), or 7 squares, with 3 to either side of one tall image. 


6. Color correct every image to have a similar temperature/contrast level as your center image. Depending on your theme, you might want something with high contrast but low saturation so your board feels crisp and modern and monochromatic, or faded and cool so your images feel weathered. Some other boards have highly saturated colors with a unifying color thread. Some yet break this rule and unify the outer pictures to a color theme, and then do the absolute opposite in warmth/color/contrast for the center to drive home the motif’s importance. It all depends on the mood your board is trying to convey. 


7. Find a balance for your images. Try to alternate light and dark images or decide on a gradient direction. I personally try and split up images with similar content so the frames don’t look monotonous (i.e., if I’m using multiple images of hands or other body parts, I separate them with setting images like trees or stars; dark images alternate with light ones, or I do all the light images at the top, all the dark images at the bottom.)


8. Step back and consider your image from a few feet away! Does it feel balanced? Are there any images where the color correction doesn’t quite fit? Don’t be afraid to go back to the drawing board and dip into your folder of the images you initially gathered. You may be surprised what goes together!


9. Experiment, experiment, experiment! Like writing, making a mood board is all about trying new things, tweaking until you get it right.


That’s it, y’all! Go nuts! Can’t wait to see what you make.


So there you have it! Thank you, Taylor, for bringing us your expertise! The video was so much fun to do, too! Be sure to check that out here.



Writers, be sure to watch our Twitter space in the days leading up to the event for some upcoming activities, chats, etc. to help you get prepared and in the mood for #MoodPitch! We can’t wait to see what you make… and neither can the agents and editors who will be pursuing your pitches!